turbidite


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turbidite

[′tər·bə‚dīt]
(geology)
Any sediment or rock transported and deposited by a turbidity current, generally characterized by graded bedding, large amounts of matrix, and commonly exhibiting a Bouma sequence.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mughal Kot Formation bears a strong potential of hydrocarbon reservoir because such hemipelagic carbonates and turbidite sandstone are reported to be good hydrocarbon reservoirs e.g.
Furthest to the west, in the Jamtland region (Sweden), thick turbidite sequences (Follinge Formation) were deposited in a series of interconnected basins east of the probable chain of islands which supplied terrigenous clay (Jaanusson 1982; Karis & Stromberg 1998).
Chaplin (1980, 1982) interpreted the environment of deposition of the correlated Farmers Member from Bouma sequences and trace fossils as proximal turbidites in a prograding deltaic complex into a starved basin.
Well-to-well correlation between three wells (AT1-P, MC, and MT1) shown in Figure 2 exhibited that lateral continuity of these sand layers is fairly good, and the 3D seismic survey suggests the widespread deposits of the turbidite sediments beyond several kilometers [11, 22, 23].
Knelle, "Process controls on the development of stratigraphic trap potential on the margins of confined turbidite systems and aids to reservoir evaluation," AAPG Bulletin, vol.
This difference, coupled with the turbidite bedding of the basin deposits, suggests relatively rapid transitions from the pre-Late Ordovician source areas to a deep-water environment.
Meem (Kimmeridgian to Tithonian) Fm consists of various facies including shallow to relatively deep marine carbonate, shallow marine sandstone, turbidite and organically rich mudstone.
The Mesozoic-Tertiary cover bed presents greater lithological diversity, although the areas closest to the axis have a predominance of limestone, dolomite, marl, marly limestone, sandstone, clay--with and without evaporites--, lutite, conglomerate and turbidite (Fig.
This mountainous region is composed almost entirely of deep-marine, mostly non-fossiliferous distal turbidite flysch strata--particularly the southern portion, believed to have been deposited into a subducting trench between the Indian and Sunda Plates (Bannert et al., 2011; Win Swe, 2012).
Dominant geologies within the RUB include basalt, scoria and tuff (hereafter referred to as volcanic), conglomerate, mudstone, sandstone, turbidite, and unknown or manmade landfill (Edbrooke 2006).
In 2007 a project was started to work with DZ in Northern Venezuela, sampling Cretaceous Passive Margin and Tertiary turbidite formations [1, 2].