turbidity current


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turbidity current:

see oceanocean,
interconnected mass of saltwater covering 70.78% of the surface of the earth, often called the world ocean. It is subdivided into four (or five) major units that are separated from each other in most cases by the continental masses. See also oceanography.
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turbidity current

[tər′bid·əd·ē ‚kə·rənt]
(oceanography)
A highly turbid, relatively dense current carrying large quantities of clay, silt, and sand in suspension which flows down a submarine slope through less dense sea water. Also known as density current; suspension current.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turbidity currents are subaqueous sediment gravity flows that are generated by landslides, slumps or density-based avalanches (Mutti et al.
Deposits of turbidity currents, i.e., turbidites, can be found in different geological settings such as lakes, reservoirs, delta fronts and continental shelves (Walker 1976).
Provenance of Motatau Complex indicates a distant or low relief source, but the presence of the glauconitic sandstone suggests intermittent influxes of coarse silisiclastic material, possibly by turbidity current. The source of most of the Motatau detritus plutonic quartz within this sandstone is considered as plutonic protolith.
(1986), respectively, and indicate long-distance transport by debris flows and/or high-concentration turbidity currents and finally rapid collective deposition of a pebble-sand mixture.
(1986) respectively and indicate deposition by mixed low-concentration turbidity currents and hemipelagic sedimentation
Piper, D.J.W., Shor, A.N., and Hughes Clarke, J.E., 1988, The 1929 Grand Banks earthquake, slump, and turbidity current: Geological Society of America Special Paper No.
[20] Firoozabadi, B., Farhanieh, B., and Rad, M., 2003, "Hydrodynamics of 2-D Laminar Turbidity Current," J.
That suggests that a geologically recent canyon-scouring turbidity current had passed through, depleting the chasm of material that previously had accumulated, she notes.
According to Shor, "smaller bedforms develop from fast tidal currents in shallow water, but normally the flows in deep water aren't strong or persistent enough to form [such large features in gravel]." But as more surveys are conducted with sonar systems along coastlines where strong turbidity currents might have flowed, it's likely that more gravel dunes will turn up.
The most fascinating attributes of turbidity currents, their high speeds and their ability to transport coarse sediment into deep water, are also those that make them difficult to study with ocean-drilling techniques.
and Migliorini, C.I., 1950, Turbidity currents as a cause of graded bedding: Journal of Geology, v.