turbine stages

turbine stages

turbine stagesclick for a larger image
Two stages of a turbine.
A set of NGVs (nozzle guide vanes) followed by one set of rotor blades forms one stage of a turbine.
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Martelli, "Three-dimensional unsteady investigation of HP turbine stages," Proceedings of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers, Part A: Journal of Power and Energy, vol.
The PW1000G consists of a single-stage fan, three booster stages, eight high pressure compressor stages, two high pressure turbine stages and three low pressure turbine stages.
The ball bearings bounced fore and aft like pinballs between the compressor and turbine stages, robbing the engine of many blades before exiting.
Then he examines such topics as the aerodynamic performance analysis of axial-flow turbines, the preliminary aerodynamic design of radial-inflow turbine stages, and quasi-three-dimensional blade passage flow field analysis.
Thin-film sensors have the advantage of light weight and low profile, which suits them for application in both compressor and turbine stages.
The steam is then directed through separate turbine stages, with each one increasing in volume from the one before it.
The newly designed turbine stages improved the efficiency of the aeroderivative gas turbine to 38.6 percent thermal efficiency and reduced its cost.
Sometimes as many as three lacing wires could be found in old steam turbine stages. Another method, applied to avoid large diameter wires, was staggered zigzag pins.
Also, steam cooling makes more air available to expand and produce work through the turbine stages, reducing what is traditionally labeled as "chargeable air."
Another major area of study by DERA and the Ohio State turbine lab team is to measure unsteadiness in turbine loads so that turbine manufacturers can improve the design of their high work turbine stages. "Unsteadiness in turbine loads is caused by vane/blade interaction, or VBI; that is, the rotor blades cutting through the wakes of the stator vanes, and the shock waves caused by transonic turbines," explained Dunn.