turbulent boundary layer


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turbulent boundary layer

[′tər·byə·lənt ′bau̇n·drē ‚lā·ər]
(fluid mechanics)
The layer in which the Reynolds stresses are much larger than the viscous stresses.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
and Mellor, G.L., "Experiment on Convex Curvature Effects in Turbulent Boundary Layers," Journal of Fluid Mechanics 60(1):43-62, Aug.
Minimizing the burst in the turbulent boundary layer that occurs in the wall region is a commonly used method for reducing drag.
Lu, "Flow topology in compressible turbulent boundary layer," Journal of Fluid Mechanics, vol.
Results for the acoustical and vibration responses are shown for composite panels excited by the turbulent boundary layer and by a random excitation, which, as referred earlier, is a case study that was not investigated previously.
The turbulent flow is modeled with a standard k-[epsilon] model and "enhanced wall function," which is considered to be more accurate for predicting turbulent boundary layer flow.
In this work, a fully developed turbulent boundary layer must be acquired for better studying the drag reduction effects under different jetting direction conditions, so some special treatments on computational domain are taken as follows: a longer computational domain used to acquire fully developed turbulent boundary layer is established as shown in Fig.6.
On today's commercial airliners, about 40 percent of drag can be attributed to the turbulent boundary layer - a thin sheet of air just above the aircraft's skin that creates friction.
The gasper airflow jet stream has a low pressure turbulent boundary layer, which entrains and mixes surrounding air into the main airflow stream (Venturi/Bernoulli effect).
The previous numerical simulations were performed using the two-phase turbulent boundary layer (TBL) approach [2].
Rodi [12] considers all possible eddy viscosity schemes, including the k-[epsilon] scheme, for solving turbulent boundary layer problems.
On the contrary, the turbulent boundary layer features high mixing and therefore high heat exchange.