turgid

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turgid

[′tər·jəd]
(medicine)
Swollen and congested.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The turgidity and flotation of pellets; however, varied with the different sources of phosphorus in the diets.
Weatherley, "A Re-Examination of the Relative Turgidity Technique for Estimating Water Deficits in Leaves," Australian Journal of Biological Sciences, vol.
In our observation, the first sign of water loss of radish roots was perceived as loss of turgidity and softening of skin which became rubbery with the progress of storage time.
A re- examination of the relative turgidity technique for estimating water deficits in leaves.
The absence of variations in RWC values indicates that, at a certain moment, the water potential in the leaf was lower than in the soil, although at that moment the turgidity promoted a dilution of the solutes in the leaves, causing soil water potential to be lower and thus ceasing water absorption.
It provides a unique combination of inherent hemostatic properties, turgidity during wound healing, and thorough, consistent dissolution to enhance patient comfort during follow up exams.
Spray with water each time you walk past to maintain turgidity. You can either pot up your cuttings individually or leave them in their pot until the spring and separate them then.
Spray with water each time you walk past to maintain turgidity! You can either pot up your cuttings individually or leave them in their pot until the spring and separate them then.
I doubt if these poor creatures had ever been crisp and light, but by the time they reached our table they were bored into pappy turgidity. Their garlic mayo tasted of lemon and not at all of garlic.
Approximately 50 adults, collected in the greenhouse, were transferred to Petri dishes (8.5 cm x 2 cm) each containing a leaf disc of P purpureum (8.5 cm diameter) placed on a 1 cm thick layer of 1% agar to maintain the turgidity of the leaf disc.
To make a long story short, dry skin tends more toward premature aging and is very likely to have reduced turgidity, which eventually contributes to altered elasticity and firmness in aging skin.