turgid

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turgid

[′tər·jəd]
(medicine)
Swollen and congested.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
AS for the worst films of the year, THE MEXICAN turgidly underlined the truism that you need more than big star names, even if Julia Roberts is the highest paid actress in Hollywood.
He believes in romance--the romance of faraway and exotic places, romantically described in turgidly romantic prose (17)--as well as the romance of mutually fulfilling love.
Turgidly puzzling phrases and sentences fill page after page.
That Australia, like it's cousin, John Howard's Australia, never existed except as an advertising jingle, and it will never be revived except as a kind of theme-park nationalism with its painfully gauche symbolism wrapped around its turgidly corrupt shoulders.
The strictly orthodox ones, like Maurice Lamm's The Jewish Way in Death and Mourning, [2] proved to be of great practical use, but were mechanically conceived and turgidly written--besides which they often made one wonder whether the author ever conceived of the possibility that women die too.
Readers should not be put off by some rather irritating and numerous editorial lapses, nor by Hanchard's turgidly academic style, which tends to depoliticize what actually is a very political book.
He then defines and exemplifies these three types of number (8.12-15); remarks on the rarity of perfection in numerology as in everything else, for only one such number is to be found among the tens, the hundreds, the thousands, and the ten-thousands; and observes that perfect numbers end in 6 and 8 alternately (8.16-20).(6) Elias now relaxes the turgidly elementary maths: enter Euphorion (8.21).
His thrust was both anthropological and political; the content he wanted to inject was about "pure" Okanagan culture and traditions (along with a lot of irrelevant but equally "pure" ethnographic detail about the Blackfeet and the Nez Perce), as well as passages of turgidly verbose rhetoric about the plight of Indians vis-a-vis the United States government.