turmeric


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turmeric:

see gingerginger,
common name for members of the Zingiberaceae, a family of tropical and subtropical perennial herbs, chiefly of Indomalaysia. The aromatic oils of many are used in making condiments, perfumes, and medicines, especially stimulants and preparations to ease stomach distress.
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turmeric

turmeric

(looks like orange yellow ginger) powerful anti-cancer antiinflammatory antioxidant that reduces brain plaque, helps clean the blood and liver, helps rejuvenate tissues and increase energy. Curry is turmeric and mustard. India has one of the lowest cancer rates and they eat lots of curry. Put it on all your food. Turmeric has stronger antiinflammatory and antioxidant properties than milk thistle and has been shown in studies to block the formation of cancer through many mechanisms. Regular washing with turmeric reduces facial hair growth and wrinkles significantly. For burns, mix a teaspoon of turmeric with some aloe gel and apply to the burn. Also used for menstrual cramps. For a nagging cough, drink a spoonful of turmeric with water. For gum infections, apply a mixture of turmeric, sea salt and mustard oil 2-3x a day. Turmeric powder mixed with water is also known to help diarrhea by killing the organisms causing it.
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz

turmeric

[′tər·mər·ik]
(botany)
Curcuma longa. An East Indian perennial of the ginger family (Zingiberaceae) with a short stem, tufted leaves, and short thick rhizomes; a spice with a pungent, bitter taste and a musky odor is derived from the rhizome.
(materials)
An orange-red or reddish-brown dye obtained from the rhizome of turmeric.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

turmeric

1. a tropical Asian zingiberaceous plant, Curcuma longa, having yellow flowers and an aromatic underground stem
2. any of several other plants with similar roots
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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To comprehend Global (United States, European Union and China) Turmeric market dynamics in the world mainly, the worldwide Turmeric market is analyzed across major global regions.
In addition, turmeric has been shown to lower PSA levels.
The basic delivery centre for the turmeric contracts is Nizamabad with additional delivery centres at Sangli, Erode and Basmat.
Ingrid Rickers, research and development director for MegaFood, Manchester, NH, suggested that younger adults are using turmeric for antioxidant and recovery support, and those 50+ are"using turmeric for joint support and memory indications."
"She fought for the turmeric board for the last five years but the Centre did nothing", he said.
Analyses of utensils found near eastern Punjab uncovered residue from turmeric dating back almost 4,500 years.
However, little information is available about the potential effectiveness of turmeric on diabetic wound healing; therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the potential role of ethanolic extract of turmeric and honey on wound healing in experimentally induced diabetic mice.
Recent research indicates that turmeric and its compounds act against several common mutagens such as cigarette smoke condensates, benzopyrene, DMBA etc.
Curcumin-free turmeric exhibits activity against human hct-116 colon tumor xenograft: comparison with curcumin and whole turmeric.
Cousin to ginger root, turmeric, the beneficial cooking ingredient long valued for its magnificent colour, anti-inflammatory properties and abiLity to aid digestion, was a relative late-comer to the US market.