turn-off time

turn-off time

[′tərn‚ȯf ‚tīm]
(electronics)
The time that is takes a gate circuit to shut off a current.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the all-solid HVDC breaker, the turn-off time of IGBTs is about 1.7 [micro]s, and the incremental current after the detection is about 5 A, which can be ignored.
In a switching power supply--a synchronous buck converter, for example--parasitic inductance can slow down the turn-on and turn-off time of the power FET and increase switching losses.
The effect is an increase in FET turn-on and turn-off times, resulting in increased switching losses.
Turn on time specified by manufacturer is 40 ns typical and 120 ns maximum value and turn-off time is 70 ns and 200 ns accordingly.
Turn-on and turn-off times should be limited only by driving pulses source and time constant formed by current limiting resistor and parasitic LED capacitances.
According to the working principle of hysteresis comparator, the turn-off time can be calculated as following
Burst power profile (power versus time) or turn-on and turn-off times may be measured.
As proportional drive can be used advantageously, and as the collector current becomes zero gradually, the storage time and the turn-off times become small, and hence the transistors can be operated at a higher speed compared to the speed of operation of pulse-width-modulated switch-mode power converters.
The MOSFET chip is available in a 1-Form-A contact configuration, provides fast turn-On and turn-Off times in the microsecond range, and it is capable of handling both AC and DC loads.
When the ramping capability of the IC is utilized, the circuitry controls the transmit waveform turn-on and turn-off times so that the system turn-on specification is met while not splattering into adjacent channels.
However, when operated in saturation, bipolar transistors exhibit extended turn-off times due to stored charge.