turnaround


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turnaround

1. 
a. the act or process in which a ship, aircraft, etc., unloads passengers and freight at the end of a trip and reloads for the next trip
b. the time taken for this
2. the total time taken by a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle in a round trip

turnaround

[′tərn·ə‚rau̇nd]
(chemical engineering)
In petroleum refining, the shutdown of a unit after a normal run for maintenance and repair work, then putting the unit back into operation.
(engineering)
The length of time between arriving at a point and departing from that point; it is used in this sense for the turnaround of vehicles, ships in ports, and aircraft.
References in periodicals archive ?
org) is the leading organization dedicated to turnaround management, corporate restructuring, and distressed investing.
A successful turnaround requires leadership that can inspire the stakeholders and manage all aspects of the process from start to finish.
Job cuts also remain key to the carrier's turnaround plan.
Recently, Radco successfully managed numerous turnaround projects including a condominium project it "deconstructed" to an all-suites hotel in Atlanta, GA; a 37-story condominium project in Chicago, IL; and an 18-story mixed-use development in Boston, MA.
When hot-runner systems leak, experience and skilled technique should never be compromised for the delusion of a quick turnaround.
The turnaround firm Knowlton eventually hired performed its own assessment and determined that, beneath all the adversity, was a solid business model and that with focus, careful planning and rigorous execution, the issues could be fixed and the company could be returned to health.
The overriding role of a turnaround professional is to secure the return to good health of a distressed business or organisation which is in serious danger of failing.
The negative outlook reflects our expectations that AVH's operating problems will continue as the hospital attempts to implement turnaround initiatives to improve operating performance, copes with regional utilization pressures and service area dynamics, and struggles with governance issues at the district's board.
The turnaround manager uses these ratios to generate a picture of the company that indicates the ability of the business to survive.
For faltering companies, an experienced turnaround consultant who complements the services and support of other professionals can make the difference between recovery and bankruptcy by devising short- and long-term solutions for financial problems.