turnaround

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turnaround

1. 
a. the act or process in which a ship, aircraft, etc., unloads passengers and freight at the end of a trip and reloads for the next trip
b. the time taken for this
2. the total time taken by a ship, aircraft, or other vehicle in a round trip
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

turnaround

[′tərn·ə‚rau̇nd]
(chemical engineering)
In petroleum refining, the shutdown of a unit after a normal run for maintenance and repair work, then putting the unit back into operation.
(engineering)
The length of time between arriving at a point and departing from that point; it is used in this sense for the turnaround of vehicles, ships in ports, and aircraft.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
This study extends the literature on the value of financial ratios to organizational turnaround in four ways.
Several new projects were also implemented during the regular turnarounds. They are expected to contribute to the more efficient, reliable and safe operation of the refinery.
The process begins years before the turnaround, with meetings to determine what needs to done.
One common reason that turnarounds under-perform: responsibility is distributed.
PanickerS, ManimalaMJ (2015) Successful turnarounds: the role of appropriate enterpreneurial strategies.
Taking place every six years, the turnaround involves a team of SABIC staff and more than 200 contractors carrying out preventative maintenance, cleaning and repair work.
The first Chapter describes the challenges of turnaround, hypothetically portraying a day in the life of a turnaround CEO,in Chapter 2 the author shares experiences of his turnaround journey as CEO of HMV, and Chapter 3 depicts another turnaround case of Bharat Tiles.
Christoph Lymbersky of the Turnaround Management Society on why most corporate restructuring methods fail and is now published as a book.
"The turnaround policies are based on the claim that dramatic reconstitution of staff actually helps schools, and that's not supported by the research," says Trujillo.
A turnaround is to produce a noticeable and endurable improvement in performance.
"We have also introduced ambulance liaison officers at A&E units, consulted with NWAS staff to obtain their views and written to hospital chief executives to discuss the impact hospital turnarounds can have on the ambulance service and patients."