blind

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blind

1. done without being able to see, relying on instruments for information
2. (of cultivated plants) having failed to produce flowers or fruits
3. Poker a stake put up by a player before he examines his cards
4. Hunting chiefly US and Canadian a screen of brush or undergrowth, in which hunters hide to shoot their quarry
www.eyecarefoundation.org
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Blind

A device to obstruct vision or keep out light, consisting of a shade, screen, or an assemblage of panels or slats.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

blind

[blīnd]
(engineering)
A solid disk inserted at a pipe joint or union to prevent the flow of fluids through the pipe; used during maintenance and repair work as a safety precaution. Also known as blank.
(geology)
Referring to a mineral deposit with no surface outcrop.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

blind

1. A device to obstruct vision or keep out light; usually a shade, a screen, or an assemblage of light panels or slats.
2. A solid disk inserted in a pipe joint or union to prevent the flow of water during the repair of a water distribution system.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Up to now, an acquiescent media had turned a blind eye to marital infidelity among France's political class, but the book Sexus Politicus, by French journalists Dubois and Deloire broke the taboo, with the complicity of the politicians involved.
A COVENTRY pensioner "turned a blind eye" to his son growing cannabis in the loft of his house, a court heard yesterday.
In Ghana, Phillips pairs his interactions with American Pan-Africanists coming "home" to Africa with his account of an African minister in 18th-century Accra, who turned a blind eye to the slave trade flourishing around him.