turning

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turning

an object made on a lathe

turning

[′tərn·iŋ]
(mechanical engineering)
Shaping a member on a lathe.

turning

The shaping of objects by means of cutting tools while the material, from which the objects are made, rotates rapidly on a lathe.
References in classic literature ?
It's the third turning on the left hand from the jail doors--that's the way we must go.
If I call him by five o'clock,' said Varden, turning hurriedly to his wife, and he washes himself clean and changes his dress, he may get to the Tower Stairs, and away by the Gravesend tide-boat, before any search is made for him.
I went back to the beach, and turning eastward past the burning enclosure, made for a point where a shallow spit of coral sand ran out towards the reef.
Men of Helium," I cried, turning to the spectators, and speaking over the heads of my judges, "how can John Carter expect justice from the men of Zodanga?
Since you have failed to persuade Miss Conyers to leave London, Captain Granet," he went on, turning towards the latter, "may I ask what your own movements are likely to be?
Then go, and sin no more,' replied I, turning away.
There is no telling how long Kit might have stood upon the ladder, addressing his master and mistress by turns, and generally turning towards the wrong person, if Barbara had not at that moment come running up to say that a messenger from the office had brought a note, which, with an expression of some surprise at Kit's oratorical appearance, she put into her master's hand.
You know," said the princess in the same tone of voice and still in French, turning to a general, "my husband is deserting me?
Wait," said Valentine; and, turning to her grandfather, she repeated, "Wa -- We -- Wi" -- The old man stopped her at the last syllable.
No wonder that, not-withstanding his desire to get on, he could not help pausing to look at a curious large beech which he had seen standing before him at a turning in the road, and convince himself that it was not two trees wedded together, but only one.
Henry Crawford, who meanwhile had taken up the play, and with seeming carelessness was turning over the first act, soon settled the business.
And the horse really did not lose the road but followed its windings, turning now to the right and now to the left and sensing it under his feet, so that though the snow fell thicker and the wind strengthened they still continued to see way-marks now to the left and now to the right of them.