turnover

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turnover

1. 
a. the amount of business, usually expressed in terms of gross revenue, transacted during a specified period
b. (as modifier): a turnover tax
2. the rate at which stock in trade is sold and replenished
3. 
a. the number of workers employed by a firm in a given period to replace those who have left
b. the ratio between this number and the average number of employees during the same period

turnover

[′tərn‚ō·vər]
(cell and molecular biology)
The number of substrate molecules transformed by a single molecule of enzyme per minute, when the enzyme is operating at maximum rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
The majority of prior research on this subject rely on turnover intentions of public accounting firm employees (e.g., Dillard and Ferris, 1979; Hall and Smith, 2009; Parker, Nouri, and Hayes, 2011) rather than actual turnover.
(1992) showed that turnover intention and actual turnover is related in the .3 range.
While the Ducks are currently on pace for the worst performance in turnover margin in Bellotti's 12 seasons as head coach at Oregon, it isn't unusual for them to be on the minus side of takeaways and lost turnovers.
In 1998, for instance, one of Oregon's best offensive teams ever finished the season with five more lost turnovers than the UO defense had takeaways.
(1) Because the objective of this study is to analyze whether forced CEO turnover is a mechanism for change, we examine how new CEOs alter the committee structure of their firms relative to the firm's pre-turnover structure and relative to the matched sample of firms.
Our study adds to our understanding of board committee structure by providing an in-depth examination of the composition of committees around forced turnover. Our analysis includes the determinants of committee membership for the full sample of directors and for forced- versus matched-sample directors.
Even more significant than the expense incurred because of turnover is the loss in income and value.
In this example, only one month of higher than budgeted turnover decreased NOI by $3,450, or nearly 4 percent.
The attention paid to such dramatic and visible leadership changes might suggest that they are typical events, and that they represent a trend toward more frequent and contentious top management turnover. Whether this is in fact true can only be determined by studying CEO turnover and the conditions surrounding it over an extended period of time.
Considerable organizational research has been conducted to try to identify the factors influencing the decision to remove top managers and those predicting how firms will behave when faced with the turnover situation.
Researchers investigating employee turnover theories in the hospitality industry suggest that there are specific factors influencing the trend (D' Annunzio-Green, Maxwell & Watson, 2004).
It is certain that many will not be surprised by the fact that the Leisure and Hospitality industry has such a high rate of turnover because turnover culture is considered to be a major problem in the hospitality industry.