turn

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Related to turns: turns out

turn

1. Music a melodic ornament that makes a turn around a note, beginning with the note above, in a variety of sequences
2. Theatre chiefly Brit a short theatrical act, esp in music hall, cabaret, etc.

turn

[′tərn]
(electricity)
One complete loop of wire.
(mathematics)

TURN

(messaging, protocol)
An SMTP command with which a client asks the server to open an SMTP connection to the client, thus reversing their roles.

Superseded by ETRN.
References in classic literature ?
It was a body of cruelty so horrible that I am confident no normal person exists who, once aware of it, could ever enjoy looking on at any trained-animal turn.
He gets paid nothing for his turns. No amateur gets paid.
Then she turned to the landlord, and questioned him as to whether HE would not have fought a duel, if challenged.
...you shall make them a present of their lives....For, with your own fair hands, you shall turn the scorpion....
Most eagerly of all her mind turned to the wondrously exciting problem about to be solved: behind which of all these fascinating doors was waiting now her room--the dear, beautiful room full of curtains, rugs, and pictures, that was to be her very own?
While the count was being turned over, one of his arms fell back helplessly and he made a fruitless effort to pull it forward.
He turned, and tottered towards his loom, and got into the seat where he worked, instinctively seeking this as the strongest assurance of reality.
Norah's face was the first to change; Norah's head was the first to turn away.
In the moment when she turned, the chill of a sudden terror gripped her round the heart, as with the clasp of an icy hand.
"On coming there, he would see on his left, Monsieur Stangerson; he would turn to the right, towards the 'off-turning' gallery--the way he had pre-arranged for flight, where, at the intersection of the two galleries, he would see at once, as I have explained, on his left, Frederic Larsan at the end of the 'off-turning' gallery, and in front, Daddy Jacques, at the end of the 'right' gallery.
A puny, miserable little creature like Dickenson could prate of happiness and turn a shining face to the future - Dickenson who lived upon a pittance, who depended upon the whim of his employer, and who confessed to ambitions which were surely pitiable.
The little man pointed inland, so that the giant was forced to turn away from the others to look in the direction indicated.