turtledove


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Related to turtledove: mourning dove

turtledove:

see pigeonpigeon,
common name for members of the large family Columbidae, land birds, cosmopolitan in temperate and tropical regions, characterized by stout bodies, short necks, small heads, and thick, heavy plumage.
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turtledove

any of several Old World doves of the genus Streptopelia, having a brown plumage with speckled wings and a long dark tail
References in periodicals archive ?
Tucked away in the corner of the grounds is a very special little building called Turtledove Hideaway - a charming one-bedroom cottage and successful holiday let that has won numerous awards Price...
They used the software to gauge how much power a turtledove wingbeat produces and how cockatiels contort their wings and accelerate.
The modern US writer Harry Turtledove is one who has produced a series of such stories, one set in a world where the Confederates won the American Civil War, for example, another about an alien invasion in the midst of World War II, and a series set in the Byzantine Empire as it might have been if Islam had never arisen.
Shakespeare's poem laments the recent deaths of the Phoenix and a Turtledove. No one knows for sure who or what these allegorical birds represent.
Pick of the bunch is Hypnose, with the lovely Turtledove and Half Steady other notable inclusions.
Noah also offered a calf, a goat, a lamb, kids, salt, a young dove, and a turtledove as burnt offerings (Jub.
Clarke, Terry Bisson), Latina/o characters (Marge Piercy, Robert Heinlein and Native American characters (Orson Scott Card, Pamela Sargent, Harry Turtledove); however, few of these texts highlight cultural diversity or issues of racism.
At Juan Chavez's feet (he is also, consequently, positioned under a tree), a turtledove chick, its sparse down colored various shades of red and gray, has just fallen from the nest and lies motionless on the sidewalk for the few remaining seconds or minutes separating it from its inevitable demise.
Here, the name "Marguerite" means "pearl." In what Ruskin tells us is the best medieval Christian heraldry, that of the French in the late Middle Ages, the names of stones are often used to blazon colors "Marguerite," for many harmonizing reasons, being used to mean "gray." "Marguerite"--gray--is the color of "the abatement of the light, the abatement of the darkness." "Marguerite"--the gray before the dark, or dawn--pre-eminently refers therefore to "Patience, between this which recedes and that which advances"; therefore it is "the colour of the turtledove, with the message that the waters have abated [Genesis 8]'; and if it is the color of the dove, then it is "the colour of the sacrifice of the poor [again, a dove; Leviticus 12]--therefore of humility."
Also from Phoenix Pick science fiction and fantasy Stellar Guild series is "On the Train" (9781612420769, $12.99) by Harry Turtledove and Rachel Turtledove, telling the story of a train on the rails through the mechanical and magical.
The novel documents attempts to re-establish connections and the focus on these connections, their disruption, and how they are to be re-formed keeps the plot fast-paced and unpredictable: perfect for any science fiction holding seeing popularity either with Turtledove's writings or disaster novels in particular.