twiller

twiller

(TWitter thrILLER) A novel distributed to followers as consecutive Twitter messages (tweets). See Twitterese.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1630s, Van Twiller transferred two parcels of the plantation to Jan Van Rotterdam and Francis Lastley; the lane that divided "their farms would eventually come to be known as Christopher Street, the oldest street in the area" (4).
The two opening chapters provide a measure of contextual background and a cursory survey of the tentative beginnings of the New Netherland colony from Hudson's explorations in 1609 of Upper New York Bay and the river subsequently named after him until the recall of Director Wouter van Twiller [1633-1637] in 1637.
Built in 1828 and landmarked in 1969, the Wilson Hunt House is one of a group of nine Federal houses on a site that was once the farm of Annetje Jans, to whom it was granted in 1636 by Dutch Director General, Van Twiller.
One piece caught Webster's eye when Irving ala Knickerbocker described the famous, but ancient, Dutch governor of New Netherlands - Wouter Van Twiller as being ".
Of course, there was more to Webster's assessment than Van Twiller.
This long, narrow island, which is nowhere more than three blocks wide, has been an anomaly ever since the Dutch governor of New Amsterdam, Wouter van Twiller, purchased it from the Canarsie Indians, when it was called Hog Island.
In a parallel transaction, the gas-fired power plant at the mill site is being sold to Van Twiller B.
The male members of the cast, with the exception of Paul Mullins' crisply done Ralph Twiller, who's been fiercely bit by the acting bug, tend to get lost in the shuffle.
Probably unnecessary are footnotes that identify Wouter Van Twiller, Sam Weller, the delectable mountains, de Tocqueville, Nebuchadnezzar, the authors of Pendennis and Bleak House and "The Raven," popular phrases from Hamlet, Othello, The Tempest, Julius Caesar, Hiawatha, and "Thanatopsis," or that explain Johnsonian style and Emerson's 1855 letter to the unknown Whitman.
The American tall tale made its formal bow in Washington Irving's History of New York by Diedrich Knickerbocker (1809), with its profile of Governor Wouter Van Twiller, for example, who was "exactly five feet six inches in height and six feet five inches in circumference.
Irving's profile of Twiller was based on the memoirs of David Pieterszen de Vries, a sea captain and colonizer who had disliked Twiller intensely.