two-part experiment

two-part experiment

[′tü ′pärt ik′sper·ə·mənt]
(statistics)
An experiment in which two operations or actions are performed; for example, throwing two dice, drawing two marbles from a box, throwing a die and then drawing a marble from a box.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The type of music being listened to in the background while completing the two-part experiment differentiated these groups.
To test out the fontal cortex's involvement in vision, the researchers ran a two-part experiment.
The 12 females and eight males (average age 26) participated in a two-part experiment that involved walking in a quiet nature setting and in a noisy urban setting.
Here we describe a two-part experiment. The first part of the experiment examines three phenomena:
TMTHE house bit of it may be over, but Big Brother is of course a two-part experiment. Phase two sees our vulnerable guinea pigs released back into the wild, and charts their downward spiral in increasingly sarcastic newspaper reports.
We designed the experiment as a two-part experiment. In the first part of the experiment, subjects were given a Payoff Table showing the individual profits accruing to any participant as a function of the number of entrants and then asked to make only an entry decision.