two-person game

two-person game

[′tü ¦pər·sən ′gām]
(mathematics)
A game consisting of exactly two players with competing interests.
References in periodicals archive ?
Meanwhile a mildly entertaining two-person game can also be played using the 12 DISKOS.
As another example of machine theorem discovery, consider the problem of finding conditions under which a two-person game has a unique pure Nash equilibria payoff.
A game of rock, papers, scissors determines who gets to play first in a two-person game. Multiple players must shoot a marble into a circle drawn on the ground.
The games lacked the interactive quality of today's, and engaging in a two-person game with a group of friends meant you had to take turns and spend a lot of time waiting.
The simplest form of game theory is a two-person game. Since each player can choose one of two strategies, the two players will reach four possible decisions as a joint effort.
This two-person game can be traced back 3000 years ago in Africa.
We ended up eating crispy duck in the middle of the afternoon in Shipley and commandeering some playing fields near Cragg Vale for a strange two-person game of rounders with a baseball bat and a tennis ball ...
For the sake of simplicity, this will be examined as a two-person game.
In The Intelligence of Democracy Lindblom (1965, 33) describes a two-person game for explaining the requirements for adaptive incremental adjustment.
The experiment payoffs were for a two-person game with two strategies, which would today be called "cooperate" and "defect." Nash's thesis advisor noticed the payoffs written on a blackboard and made up the story of the "prisoner's dilemma." Nash later objected to the procedure in which the participants were paired together for many rounds, repeating the same game.
One of the great contributions of game theory has been to the study of the two-person game. In the Cold War, the development of the two-person, zero-sum game fit in naturally with worst-case scenarios and evaluations of "Red" capabilities; in addition, the literature on two-person, non-zero-sum games brought to light many paradoxes in the estimation of threats and the role of communication.
In the two-person game these values simply determine the payoff matrix of the game.