twopence


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twopence

, tuppence Brit
a former British silver coin, now only coined as Maundy money
References in classic literature ?
I agree with you," said Stepan Arkadyevitch, sincerely and genially; though he was aware that in the class of those who could be bought for twopence halfpenny Levin was reckoning him too.
The person, who is one of those extraordinary specimens of human fungus that spring up spontaneously in the western streets of London, ready dressed in an old red jacket, with a "mission" for holding horses and calling coaches, received his twopence with anything but transport, tosses the money into the air, catches it over-handed, and retires.
Many months after the re-establishment of peace and order, and even when it had ceased to be the town-talk, that every military officer, kept at free quarters by the City during the late alarms, had cost for his board and lodging four pounds four per day, and every private soldier two and twopence halfpenny; many months after even this engrossing topic was forgotten, and the United Bulldogs were to a man all killed, imprisoned, or transported, Mr Simon Tappertit, being removed from a hospital to prison, and thence to his place of trial, was discharged by proclamation, on two wooden legs.
Do you think she likes paying twopence a time, or what is it?
After that I had a three-mile fare, and there were bags and boxes enough to have brought in a good many twopences if they had been put outside; but you know how people do; all that could be piled up inside on the front seat were put in and three heavy boxes went on the top.
ANEW stage play, based on the best-selling book by acclaimed Twopence To Cross The Mersey author Helen Forrester, is to receive its UK premiere in Liverpool.
1855: The Daily Telegraph was published in London for the first time, priced twopence, with Alfred Bate Richards its first editor.
5 The entrance to Hogarth's basement gin cellar carries the notice: "Drunk for a penny, dead drunk for twopence, clean straw for nothing.
Following a redesign, the bridge finally opened in 1863, with a toll of half a penny for foot passengers, a penny for animals and twopence for horse-drawn vehicles.
1855: The Daily Telegraph was published in |London for the first time, priced twopence, with Alfred Bate Richards its first editor.
Prices of fish varied according to the variety - prices of halfpenny and penny for ordinary white fish, with haddock costing twopence and skate at twopence and fourpence.
There were coconut chips, sherbet fountains, slab toffee, plain and nutty, that the shopkeeper broke with a little hammer, liquorice comfits, the red ones were much prized by little girls who used them as lipstick, marzipan bonbons, raspberry ruffles, liquorice laces, all at twopence a quarter.