tympanic membrane

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tympanic membrane

the thin translucent oval membrane separating the external ear from the middle ear. It transmits vibrations produced by sound waves, via the ossicles, to the cochlea

Tympanic Membrane

 

eardrum, a thin layer of connective tissue and epithelium covering the opening of the tympanic cavity in the ear of terrestrial vertebrates and man. The tympanic membrane is absent in caudate and legless amphibians and burrowing snakes. Sound waves on striking the membrane cause it to vibrate. The vibrations are then transmitted to the inner ear mostly by the auditory ossicles. The membrane is divided into three concentric zones in mammals and man because of the uneven action of forces on some of its parts: medial (which moves without becoming deformed), intermediate (the most delicate and strongly vibrated), and lateral (hinged, movable).

G. N. SIMKIN

tympanic membrane

[tim′pan·ik ′mem‚brān]
(anatomy)
The membrane separating the external from the middle ear. Also known as eardrum; tympanum.
References in periodicals archive ?
The postoperative tympanic membrane morphology, average of pure-tone hearing thresholds and average air-bone gap were used as the indices for evaluating therapeutic effects.
The purposes of closing chronic dry perforations of the tympanic membrane are to improve hearing and prevent middle ear infections.
There are unresolved issues in understanding the tympanic membrane and its behaviour [2].
I'm not talking about the situation in which one physician has seen a normal tympanic membrane at 4 in the afternoon and at 7 in the morning the same ear has drained.
1) although tympanoplasty is a highly successful procedure in 90-95% of well ventilated middle ears, the prognosis is poorer in cases with eustaschian tube dysfunction, infection, adhesive tympanic membrane, and total perforation in tympanic membrane.
NEW ORLEANS -- A systematic approach to rating the appearance of a child's tympanic membrane may be a practical way to help decide whether or not a child with otitis media needs an antibiotic.
1) They also surveyed 122 otolaryngologists concerning their experience with this practice; a total of 21 injuries were reported, including burns and injuries related to the accumulation of candle wax in the external auditory canal and on the tympanic membrane.
As we better understand the healing mechanisms of the eardrum and the ways that steroids affect those mechanisms, we should be able to use topical steroids to our advantage in helping tympanic membranes heal in a nonpathologic manner.
Placing a ventilation tube in the tympanic membrane does not help these patients; in fact, it might worsen the situation.
The follow-up ENT examination revealed that both tympanic membranes were hot normal--specifically, they were slightly thickened.

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