maturity-onset diabetes

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maturity-onset diabetes

[mə′chu̇r·əd·ē ¦ȯn‚set ‚dī·ə′bēd·əs]
(medicine)
A type of diabetes mellitus which develops later in life; characterized by more gradual development and less severe symptoms than juvenile-onset diabetes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The YMCA's Diabetes Support Program empowers participants to make lasting lifestyle changes that will improve their overall health and reduce their chance of developing Type 2 diabetes, and help reduce the long lasting health complications resulting from Type 2 diabetes.
Finding out your risk of Type 2 diabetes could be the most important thing you do today.
For patients considered high risk, the NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme (NDPP) - 'Healthier You' - provides free tailored, personalised help to reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes including education on healthy eating and lifestyle, help to lose weight and bespoke physical exercise programmes.
If you are aware of your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, you can take steps to look after your health and prevent or delay its onset and its serious complications.
I have been living with type 2 diabetes for a number of years and I feel like I need some new motivation to help me manage my condition more positively - is there anything I can do?
A study of 50 Asian Indians with type 2 diabetes and elevated cholesterol levels found that substituting whole, unroasted almonds, which is already a familiar food in the Indian culture, for 20% of calories in a well-balanced diet significantly improved measures of heart health that are linked
And why isn't it possible to reverse all Type 2 diabetes? Dr Rajeswaran added: "When someone has had Type 2 diabetes for a very long duration their pancreas is not functioning very well and weight loss will not reverse their diabetes." A study of more than 300 GP patients in Scotland and North East England, published in the medical journal The Lancet last year, showed that nearly half of those who joined a weight management programme saw their Type 2 diabetes go into remission.
Aside from the widespread lack of awareness of cardiovascular disease as the leading cause of death in patients with type 2 diabetes, 52% of the patients with type 2 diabetes and a similar proportion of their loved ones were unaware that type 2 diabetes is associated with any increased risk of cardiovascular disease and other macrovascular events, noted Dr.
Patients with Type 2 diabetes have two to three times the heart disease risk of the general population.
A lack of participation in clubs or other social groups was associated with 60% higher odds of pre-diabetes and 112% higher odds of type 2 diabetes in women compared to those with normal glucose metabolism.