typhus fever


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Related to typhus fever: typhoid fever, trench fever

typhus fever

[′tī·fəs ′fē·vər]
(medicine)
Any of three louse-borne human diseases caused by Rickettsia prowazakii characterized by fever, stupor, headaches, and a dark-red rash.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1853 this was twenty-one days for smallpox and fourteen days for 'ship fever' and in 1883, twenty-one days for smallpox, typhus fever and 'relapsing fevers', ten days for cholera and yellow fever and at the discretion of the Health Officer in most other cases.
In 1853, Alleyne quarantined seventeen of the 569 ships because of measles, typhus fever, scarlet fever or smallpox.
Illustrating the basic cost of quarantining a sailing ship in 1837, the master of the Lady MacNaghten successfully claimed 302 [pounds sterling] 13s 10d (the 1998 equivalent being about 18,200 [pounds sterling] stg (19) from the government for the use of his ship for thirty three days as a hospital ship for passengers and crew infected with typhus fever.
Quarantine for typhus fever was also unnecessary, he stated, since the disease was entirely 'of local and atmospheric origin' and the 'febrile miasma' emanating from the disease would be dispersed on land.
The closely confined living arrangements and the insanitary conditions in steerage class provided a breeding ground for diseases such as typhus fever (mainly spread by body lice), measles, scarlet fever and whooping cough (mainly spread by airborne droplets), smallpox (mainly spread by secretions from skin lesions and by contaminated articles such as clothing and bedding) and cholera (mainly spread by faecal contamination of water and food).
Fear, stigmatization, and discrimination plagued Russian Jewish immigrants when the 1892 outbreaks of typhus fever and cholera in New York City were traced to Russian Jewish immigrants from Eastern Europe (8).
In March 2002, typhus fever was diagnosed in two patients residing in West Virginia and Georgia.
Epidemiologic and clinical characteristics of flying squirrel- associated typhus fever in the United States, 1984-2002 (a) Case no.
Typhus fever with particular reference to the Serbian epidemic.