typical


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typical

Biology having most of the characteristics of a particular taxonomic group

Typical

 

that which is normal or of the nature of a model; the most likely for a given system of the objective world.

As applied to aesthetics, the concept of the typical was most extensively elaborated in some 19th-century literary theories with respect to the then current view of the specific character of realism in the arts—as, for example, in the works of V. G. Belinskii, H. Taine, and G. Brandes. In a letter to M. Harkness (1888), F. Engels described realism in the arts as “the truthful reproduction of typical characters in typical circumstances” (K. Marx and F. Engels, Soch., 2nd ed., vol. 37, p. 35).

The term “typification” (tipizatsiia) is often applied to the complex artistic process that creates characters “true to type.” Alternatively, typification may refer to the depiction of a single individual as a synthesis of typical traits that the artist has taken from many actual persons. What is more essential, however, is that the artist develop to the fullest possible extent the potentialities manifested by living individuals. The representation of typical characters, as well as their interaction with each other and with circumstances, reflects the artist’s cognizance of the substantive correlation between the individual and society.

References in classic literature ?
like another typical personage; and yet how many millions and billions of Georges Dandins there are in real life who feel inclined to utter this soul-drawn cry after their honeymoon, if not the day after the wedding
Abingdon is a typical country town of the smaller order - quiet, eminently respectable, clean, and desperately dull.
There was about him something of Weyrother, Mack, and Schmidt, and many other German theorist-generals whom Prince Andrew had seen in 1805, but he was more typical than any of them.
For the fragment of a life, however typical, is not the sample of an even web: promises may not be kept, and an ardent outset may be followed by declension; latent powers may find their long-waited opportunity; a past error may urge a grand retrieval.
There I found joy and sorrow mixed, and nothing abstract or typical, but everything standing for itself, and not for some other thing.
That powerful poetry was twin-brother to a prose, of more varied, but certainly of wilder and more irregular power than the admirable, the typical, prose of Dryden.
One, pale, quiet, and unobtrusive, dressed in sober black, the typical lawyer's clerk, was busy gathering up a collection of papers and documents from the table, over which they had been strewn.
It was the first time Sheldon had been at close quarters with an American girl, and he would have wondered if all American girls were like Joan Lackland had he not had wit enough to realize that she was not at all typical.
The next moment he was mounted and beside her, and, with Wolf sliding along ahead in his typical wolf-trot, they went up the hill that led out of town--two lovers on two chestnut sorrel steeds, riding out and away to honeymoon through the warm summer day.
It was ruined, but not a ruin--a typical Californian substitute for what are known to guide-bookers abroad as "monuments of the past.
The imaginative treatment of the spiritual life, as in 'Paradise Lost' or 'The Faerie Queene,' or the impassioned exaltation of imaginative beauty, as in much Elizabethan poetry, seemed to the typical men of the Restoration unsubstantial and meaningless, and they had no ambition to attempt flights in those realms.
I hastened to assure him I was not in the least typical.