Tyrannosaur

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tyrannosaurus

, tyrannosaur
any large carnivorous bipedal dinosaur of the genus Tyrannosaurus, common in North America in upper Jurassic and Cretaceous times: suborder Theropoda (theropods)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Tyrannosaur

[tə′ran·ə‚sȯr]
(pateontology)
A large carnivorous therapod dinosaur 40 feet (12 meters) long and weighing 6 tons, from the Late Cretaceous Period that had powerful hindlimbs, short forelimbs, a large skull (4 feet long), and very powerful jaws.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The findings are frequently driven by the discoveries of many fossils of smaller tyrannosaurs worldwide.
"Early in their evolution, tyrannosaurs hunted in the shadows of archaic lineages such as allosaurs that were already established at the top of the food chain."
It "captures tyrannosaurs at a key point in their evolutionary transformation," notes Lawrence Witmer, who studies the soft tissues of dinosaur heads at Ohio University, Athens.
A fossil from a new species of dinosaur is helping to bridge a crucial 20-million-year gap in tyrannosaur evolution.
The long-nosed tyrannosaur's bones were discovered by workmen on a construction site in China.
Until now, only two fossilised tyrannosaurs with elongated heads had been found, both of which were juveniles.
Edinburgh's Dr Steve Brusatte said: "This is a different breed of tyrannosaur. It has the familiar toothy grin of T- rex, but its snout was much longer and it had a row of horns on its nose.
Spinosaur teeth are smooth and shaped liked cones--more like those of modern crocodiles than of tyrannosaurs. An analysis of the chemical makeup of the teeth turned up even more evidence.
A team led by Dr Paul Serano examined the fossils and their importance was revealed when it became clear this was an adult dinosaur bearing all the hallmarks of later giant tyrannosaurs but at a fraction of the size.
The new evidence suggested that for most of their time on Earth, tyrannosaurs may have been living in the shadow of larger dinosaurs.
However, it also held surprises: A lot of dinosaurs would have looked really strange because they were completely feathered--like the recently discovered tyrannosaur, which we named Dilong paradoxus, meaning "surprising emperor dragon." It wasn't the first feathered dinosaur discovered, but it was the first tyrannosaur ever found with primitive feathers.