Ulama

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Related to ulamas: ulemas, Islamic scholar
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Ulama

 

(ulema), Muslim theologians and canon lawyers. During the Middle Ages, the ulama presided over Muslim religious institutions, schools, and courts and acted as expounders of Islamic law. They also managed the income derived from the waqfs. Today, the ulama still exercise considerable influence in most countries of the Middle East.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapter two gives a broad overview of Benaadiri history and the evolution of the Ulama. Here, almost all the accounts of the stories of origin of towns were linked to Islam and the author recognizes the discrepancy as Islam came later to the Benaadir region.
Chapter three throws light on a very important factor in the survival of the Benaadiri, the foundation of the authority of the Ulama (Sufis).
On March 9, the Bangsamoro Supreme Council of Ulama issued a fatwa calling on Muslims in the Philippines not to vote for Estrada due to his anti-Muslim actions.
Among the prominent Ulamas that honoured the president's invitation were Sheikh Dahiru Usman Bauchi, leader of the Quadirriya sect in Nigeria and Sheikh Bala Lau, who leads the Izala sect.
The ILMU ulama stated their explicit rejection of such practice in Malaysia.
An analysis of the position forwarded by the ILMU ulama on the issues cited above indicates the symbiotic relationship between the ulama and the Malaysian government.
'We don't have to use social media to slander, lie or create a specific perception among the people but we need to use the platform to educate them,' he said in a 'live' telecast of the Dewan Ulama convention from the Permai Hotel in Kuala Terengganu today.
The Ulama convention this morning is the start of the four-day PAS muktamar in Terengganu.
Finally, this analysis will seek to encourage a more institutional and interest-based approach to the ulama. Studies have generally stressed the ideological and religious role of clerics and have neglected the institutional based interests in maintaining control over the spheres historically under their authority (e.g.
I will show that the ulama, a group that received much (possibly excessive) attention from scholars studying post-World War II Iran, were not passive recipients of Reza Shah's dictates, but helped mold the outcomes and even benefited from Reza Shah's policies.