funny bone

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funny bone,

highly sensitive area at the back of the elbow where the ulnar nerve passes close to the surface of the skin in a groove between end prominences of the humerus (the upper arm bone) and the ulna (the large forearm bone). A blow to the area causes the nerve to compress against bone, producing a characteristic tingling in the forearm and the last two fingers.

funny bone

the area near the elbow where the ulnar nerve is close to the surface of the skin: when it is struck, a sharp tingling sensation is experienced along the forearm and hand
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References in periodicals archive ?
Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction in athletes: Muscle-splitting approach without transposition of the ulnar nerve. J Shoulder Elbow Surg 2001;10:152-7.
Age changes in maximum conduction velocity of motor fibers of human ulnar nerves. J Appl Physiol 1953;5:589-93.
Ulnar nerve compression at the elbow and heterotopic ossification: a report of five cases.
The ulnar nerve was not rofutinely exposed, dissected, or transposed with this approach.
Poppi, "Delayed paralysis of the anterior ulnar nerve in posttraumatic varus deformity of the elbow," Archivio "Putti" di Chirurgia degli Organi di Movimento, vol.
There are 5 anatomic sites of ulnar nerve compromise at the elbow: (1) intermuscular (IM) septum of the distal arm (including the Areade of Struthers, medial IM septum, hypertrophy of medial head of triceps brachii, and snapping of medial head triceps brachii); (2) medial epicondylc secondary to a valgus deformity of the bone; (3) epicondylar groove (lesions within and outside of the groove and subluxation or dislocation of the nerve); (4) cubital tunnel (due to a thickened Osborne's ligament, a fibrous fascia running between the humeral and ulnar heads to the FCU) or as the nerve passes through the proximal edge of the FCU; and (5) as the ulnar nerve exits through the FCU.
When the characteristics of the sensory block of ulnar nerve were considered, it was found that the suficient block level was reached at the 9th minute in the G1group and 3rd minute in the G2 group.
MRI of the elbow was also performed, which showed no abnormalities that affected signal intensity or thickness of the ulnar nerve at the elbow segment.
In 1 case open reduction was essential and ulnar nerve was released 2 months after trauma and in 1 case 1 month after fracture median nerve release was done.
(4) Also due to the risk of worsening the neurological deficit, a biopsy cannot be performed on nerves having a motor component, such as the ulnar nerve. (5) Clinical assessment of the functional impairment of peripheral nerves may be inadequate and inaccurate as clinical evidence of neuropathy may appear late even in the presence of nerve damage.