ultramontane


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

ultramontane

1. on the other side of the mountains, esp the Alps, from the speaker or writer
2. of or relating to a movement in the Roman Catholic Church which favours the centralized authority and influence of the pope as opposed to local independence
3. a resident or native from beyond the mountains, esp the Alps
4. a member of the ultramontane party of the Roman Catholic Church
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
It was sufficiently ambiguous as to allow ultramontane conservatives and advanced liberals in Quebec to identify the religious and national aspirations of French Canadians specifically with the province.
The First Vatican Council met from December 1869 until July 1870, says O'Malley, and its decree, Pastor Aeternus defined papal primacy and infallibility, moving the Roman Catholic Church to a significantly more pope-centered mode, that is, ultramontane. He notes that pundits at the time predicted it would be the final Council, because henceforth the pope would make all decisions.
However, despite these forays into politics, it was through newspapers that these individuals with backgrounds in journalism sought to diffuse their message: Asselin's Le Nationaliste (1905), Fournier's L'Action (1911) and Le Devoir, founded by Bourassa in 1910 and with which Heroux, with a background in Catholic journalism, and the son-in-law of the ultramontane nationalist, Jules-Paul Tardivel, became closely associated.
The venerable "pere Pierriche Brindamour" (father Petey Stalkoflove), himself a good "bleu" (blue), that is an adherent to the traditionalist, ultramontane political agenda of the then dominant Conservative party, denigrates the political opinions of the "reds"--the Radicals and Liberals representing Beaugrand's own political leanings--threatening them with the risk of becoming werewolves (courir le loup-garou) (38-9).
McCabe was so worried that the ultramontane and interfering Patrick Moran would be appointed that he threatened to resign if Rome forced a coadjutor upon him who was not acceptable.
So that while the Medici duke had to import the entire idea of sacral monarchy to the former republic from ultramontane principalities, he could not copy everything used by the kings of France, Spain, and England.
(15) A few decades later, William Paterson treated an Edinburgh audience to a supposed expose of the "great Jesuit plot of the 19th century." "In the recent work of the order," he thundered, "the popish world is reconstructed, kings and counsellors disappear before the one infallible man, and over the globe this ultramontane growth is one of the most significant facts of the century." From the very moment of restoration, Paterson opined, there had been a "new fresh project for the conquest of the globe and for the reconstruction of human society." The "pope's black cohorts" were determined to "plant the foot of the pope on the neck of a prostrate mankind." Worse yet, Paterson warned, they had adopted new sinister methods.
Paris and Rome: The Gallican Church and the Ultramontane Campaign, 1848-1853, Austin Gough.
The opening article by Emmet Larkin (sadly deceased in March 2012) is the final statement of his 'devotional revolution' thesis of 1972 that did so much to place Cullen, as the agent of an ultramontane modernisation, in the foreground of subsequent analysis of nineteenth-century Ireland.
The service invites pagans to "Discover a community of Wiccans, Shamans, Druids, and Other Pagans looking for relationships." I suppose one could see this as revived paganism's reductio ad absurdum; maybe more than that, I think I see domestication of the idea that pagans are, shucks, just people, like Ultramontane Catholics.
However, art historians have identified them, the cure is Louis Veuillot, a de Mastreian ultramontane journalist: 'Let the democrats be good, just, fearful of God: Democracy is the most beautiful government men can give themselves.