ultraviolet


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ultraviolet

the part of the electromagnetic spectrum with wavelengths shorter than light but longer than X-rays; in the range 0.4 × 10--6 and 1 × 10--8 metres

ultraviolet

[¦əl·trə′vī·lət]
(physics)
Pertaining to ultraviolet radiation. Abbreviated UV.

UltraViolet

(1) See ultraviolet light.

(2) A cloud-based storage locker for licensed content from the Digital Entertainment Content Ecosystem (see DECE). Under the Digital HD brand, purchases of Blu-ray discs with redeemable coupons and purchases of movies and TV shows (not rental) from participating online retailers entitles users to keep their content in the UltraViolet cloud and stream or download it as required.

Depending on the retailer's agreement, content might be sharable with friends and family, and parental access can be applied. A physical disc may also be obtainable. See Digital HD, Blu-ray Combo Pack and media locker.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hoping to discover whether or not consumers have warmed to UltraViolet since it became commercially available in October 2011, I spoke with Teitell.
Thus SDK now offers high-brightness LEDs for all colors from the infrared LED to high-power near ultraviolet LED.
See Ultraviolet perform live and you cannot fail to be awed.
And, in fact, the average child receives three times the annual ultraviolet exposure of the average adult, and one in 10 will develop skin cancer before age 18.
However, photographic equipment can visualize the ultraviolet spectrum quite well.
It has to do with the depletion of the ozone layer, the part of the earth's atmosphere responsible for filtering the sun's ultraviolet rays before they reach us here on the ground.
At far-southern latitudes, the concentration of stratospheric ozone--an atmospheric constituent that provides protection against the sun's ultraviolet radiation--has dropped about 14 percent in the past 4 decades, says Barry Lomax of the University of Sheffield in England.
OUR KNOWLEDGE of the ultraviolet universe remained meager until telescopes could be launched into space, since these short wavelengths of light are largely absorbed by Earth's atmosphere.
For starters, chronic exposure to harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays--an invisible form of radiation that penetrates and alters the structure of skin cells--can cause irreversible, even deadly damage.
Today, leading manufacturers are pushing deeper into the ultraviolet spectrum.