ambiguity

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ambiguity

[‚am·bə′gyü·əd·ē]
(electronics)
The condition in which a synchro system or servosystem seeks more than one null position.
(navigation)
The condition in which navigation coordinates derived from a navigational instrument define more than one point, direction, line of position, or surface of position.

Ambiguity

Delphic oracle
ultimate authority in ancient Greece; often speaks in ambiguous terms. [Gk. Hist.: Leach, 305]
Iseult’s vow
pledge to husband has double meaning. [Arth. Legend: Tristan]
Loxias
epithet of Apollo, meaning “ambiguous” in reference to his practically uninterpretable oracles. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmer-man, 26]
Pooh-Bah
different opinion for every one of his offices. [Br. Opera: The Mikado, Magill I, 591–592]
References in periodicals archive ?
In Condition 1, the A-U-PW (where A indicates ambiguous, U indicates unambiguous, and PW indicates pseudoword) proportion was 30-60-90.
Clearly, this practice had no unambiguous scriptural precedent; its sole justification seemed to be the authority of the Church.
I trust that the local churches will give due attention to the medical profession, promoting the ideal of unambiguous service to the great miracle of life, supporting obstetricians, gynaecologists and health workers who respect the right to life by helping to bring them together for mutual support and the exchange of ideas and experiences.
The figures incessantly delineated by the laser beams represent a definitive loss of direction; they draw shapes that, in their momentary flashing, show an indissoluble tangle instead of unambiguous linearity.
52): "This is the first really unambiguous example of ecology playing a role in the morphological differences between the sexes.
Understandably then, prelapsarian play was an unambiguous delight.
While Anthony's aesthetic is no longer in the forefront of today's dance, such purposeful vision and unambiguous exposition will always be welcome.
Further, the relevant legislative history does not show clear Congressional intent to deviate from the statute's plain and unambiguous language.
The appeals court found the code section clear and unambiguous and therefore did not rely on any of the legislative history the parties cited in their appeal.
The task force hopes to change this unambiguous language.