care

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Related to uncompensated care: Charity care

CARE

(Cooperative for Assistance and Relief Everywhere), nonprofit, nonsectarian federation of agencies devoted to channeling relief and self-help materials to needy people in foreign countries. Organized in the United States (1945) to help war-ravaged Europe, CARE soon expanded its program to include developing nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Famous for its "CARE packages" of food and other necessities, CARE in now also involved in population, health care, land management, and small economic activity. It is now an international organization with 10 member countries and headquarters in Brussels.

care

  1. the work involved in supporting people who, because of physical frailty chronic illness or other forms of incapacity and disability, are incapable of leading an autonomous existence.
  2. other kinds of carework, e.g. in child-rearing (see CHILD CARE) and DOMESTIC LABOUR. This should be distinguished from care in sense 1.
Care in sense 1 operates over a wide range of social relations. A clear dividing line can be drawn between formal and informal care (see Abrams, 1978) as it exists in contemporary industrial societies. Formal care refers to services provided by agents of organization (statutory, voluntary and/or private) to people within clearly defined categories of need. Informal care is personally directed towards certain people who have a social relationship with their carer - usually a family member, and most often a spouse (Parker, 1993), or female relative.

Feminist sociologists (see also FEMINISM) have had a major impact on the understanding of care and caring relationships. They have argued that caring is ‘a gendered concept’ and that women constitute the majority of carers both informally, in the private sphere, and as low-paid care workers (‘care assistants’) in the formal sector (Finch and Groves, 1982; Ungerson, 1987; Lewis and Meredith, 1988). Studies of caring have examined the complex reasons why women care and the particular problems and difficulties they face. Social policies involving decarceration and COMMUNITY CARE, the decline of neighbour-hood and COMMUNITY associated with increasing SOCIAL (and geographical) MOBILITY, have placed an increasing burden on individual women carers. There is some evidence that women are reluctant to enter caring relationships with female relatives but lack viable alternatives (Cotterill, 1994). Recent research using data from the 1980 British General Household Survey has also pointed to the significant contribution made by male carers, particularly men who care for their wives (Arber and Gilbert, 1989).

care, custody, and control

Describes a standard exclusion in liability insurance policies. Under this exclusion, the liability insurance does not apply to damage to property in the care or custody of the insured, or to damage to property over which the insured is for any purpose exercising physical control.

CARE

agency devoted to channeling relief to needy people abroad. [Am. Hist.: NCE, 456]

care

in (or into) care Social welfare made the legal responsibility of a local authority by order of a court
References in periodicals archive ?
It is called uncompensated care because many uninsured patients cannot pay their bills, and no small number of them are forced into bankruptcy.
Cunningham said he doesn't know what that change to Arkansas Works will mean for uncompensated care at hospitals.
The four PeaceHealth hospitals in Lane County provided more than $37 million in uncompensated care last year, with RiverBend in Springfield accounting for about $26 million of that, followed by the University District hospital, which includes downtown Eugene, at almost $7 million.
The increase in the uninsured would cause a spike of $88 billion in uncompensated care ($26.
We do not wish to downplay the financial impact of uncompensated care, but we believe that addressing such costs in the context of APMs is beyond the scope of this final rule," CMS officials say in the introduction to a new batch of Medicare physician payment change final regulations.
Federal officials deny the claim and have encouraged Texas to apply for additional safety-net funds, but they say they do not want to continue to pay for hospitals' uncompensated care costs that would be covered under a Medicaid expansion.
2000), much of the literature suggests that nonprofit and for-profit hospitals' decisions regarding uncompensated care provision should be examined separately.
This in turn reduces the amount of uncompensated care to the state's providers, which means less cost-shifting to our businesses and our employees.
We calculate that the money states will save' from not expanding Medicaid is less than the hospital uncompensated care costs generated by not expanding Medicaid.
My Medicaid Restoration Plan will not only honor the will of those voters, it will also provide critical health coverage to Arizona's working poor, create thousands of quality jobs and reduce the impacts of uncompensated care upon our hospitals and Arizona families.
An article from a Texas County newspaper said that the hospital there is seeing their uncompensated care going up and inpatient volume going down.
Expanded coverage reduces hospitals' uncompensated care, lowers "cost shifting" to businesses that see higher health insurance premiums as some of the costs of caring for the uninsured are passed on to them and strengthens local economies, the report said.