undercurrent


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undercurrent

a current that is not apparent at the surface or lies beneath another current

undercurrent

[′ən·dər‚kə·rənt]
(oceanography)
A water current flowing beneath a surface current at a different speed or in a different direction.
References in classic literature ?
There were very few resident landlords in the neighborhood and also very few domestic or literate serfs, and in the lives of the peasantry of those parts the mysterious undercurrents in the life of the Russian people, the causes and meaning of which are so baffling to contemporaries, were more clearly and strongly noticeable than among others.
She began to look with her own eyes; to see and to apprehend the deeper undercurrents of life.
If the ballet doesn't match the novel's pervasive mood of dread, it makes more explicit the erotic undercurrent of Dracula's blood lust and the chilling dynamics of sexual domination.
He enjoyed a particularly close rapport with female clients and there was often more than an undercurrent of intimacy when it came to the design process.
Finally, the placement of Apostolos Georgiou's painting Untitled, 2000, on the adjacent wall created a three-way line of tension among these works, a tension further developed by the thematic content of Georgiou's painting: an undercurrent of rivalry sharply underscored by the two red figures sitting opposite each other at a table, intensely and absurdly engaged in an invisible activity.
I thought of Tudor's Dark Elegies, divested of its tragic undercurrent. Corbin and Francie Huber are central to the fugitive drama their fellow couples may be no more than ghosts of their other selves.
The natural advantages of the swith include a mix of cultures, an undercurrent of conjuring, and an urge to celebrate fueled by Mardi Gras and the Roaring Twenties.
Indeed, coming on the heels of a surging '90s economy that begat art distinguished by its slick good looks (a quality increasingly extended to artists as well), Tom Sachs and David Leiber's show was a prescient about-face, charting the undercurrent among artists who have shunned professionalism in favor of an inspired amateurism.
Act II's autobiographical "It's About Time" lags when Davison sets aside the first act's marvelous undercurrent of object manipulation to ruminate on timely concerns.
The music is dry, with a strong rhythmic undercurrent, and elicits from Martins a choreography that is both aerobic and controlled, like the nonstop motion of a machine.
A comedy of manners with the unfunny undercurrent of the early years of AIDS, it follows the social and sexual adventures of the aptly named Nicholas Guest.
The exhibition's tone, while generally lighthearted, had an existential undercurrent, evoking thoughts of man's hubris in the face of mortality and physical transience.