Underpin

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Underpin

To provide a new foundation for a wall or column in an existing building without removing the superstructure.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The Vision will be effected through a series of seven-year National Strategies for Transformation (NST), underpinned by detailed sectoral strategies that are aimed toward achievement of the SDGs.
Ye, "A field study on the behavior of a foundation underpinned by micropile," Canadian Geotechnical Journal, vol.
Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg said: "In effect what we have done is adopt the so-called 'Royal Charter plus' in full, which we published last Friday and it is underpinned by legislation - both to install a real system of costs and damages and crucially to make sure that future governments can't mess around with the Royal Charter in a way that everyone had concerns (about)."
It found that, while the national and religious identities which had underpinned difference and division in Northern Ireland still remain, an increasing number of people are moving away from the traditional labels of Irish Catholic or British Protestant.
And without any coherent spiritual worldview to fall back on, France is finding itself morally adrift and in search of answers formerly underpinned by a Judeo-Christian spiritual soul.
"It's a remarkable home, and its value is underpinned by its selling price."
Untitled, 2005, is, according to the lengthy wall text, underpinned by a range of art-historical allusions including Caspar David Friedrich's Romantic sublime and Smithson's stoner musings on crystals and entropy.
HSBC has provided sub-custody and clearing services to leading institutions for over 50 years, underpinned by a reputation for exceptional client service.
Dark and dense, underpinned by dissonant piano, the music juxtaposes sharply with Eitzel's surprisingly optimistic lyrics, which invite listeners to lift tambourines and maracas, celebrate till dawn, and brutish hatred.
This analysis is strongly underpinned by Robert Hughes's 1997 essay, 'American Visions', which proposes New York as the central motif of modernity for North Americans and for western art.
But just as we now know that many nonreligious motivations underpinned the classic "wars of religion" we should not be too surprised that religious motives played a part in an earlier period.