undercut

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undercut

Forestry chiefly US and Canadian a notch cut in a tree trunk, to ensure a clean break in felling

Undercut

In stonework, to cut away a lower part, leaving a projection above that serves the function of a drip. To rout a groove back from the edge of an overhanging member.

undercut

[′ən·dər‚kət]
(electronics)
Undesirable lateral etching by chemicals in the fabrication of semiconductor devices.
(engineering)
Underside recess either cut or molded into an object so as to leave a topside lip or protuberance.
(metallurgy)
An unfilled groove melted into the base metal at the toe of a weld.
To fail to machine a part to a sufficient extent.
(mining engineering)
To cut below or in the lower part of a coal bed by chipping away the coal with a pick or mining machine; cutting is usually done on the level of the floor of the mine, extending laterally the entire face and 5 or 6 feet (1.5 or 1.8 meters) into the material.

undercut

1. In stonework, to cut away a lower part, leaving a projection above that serves the function of a drip.
2. To rout a groove or channel (a drip) back from the edge of an overhanging member.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jackie says the key to all this "is being assertive not aggressive, but you must also not undersell yourself".
And domestic manufacturers will see profit margin drop if they continue to try to undersell. So some makers have asked the Taiwan Association of Machinery Industry to convene a self-disciplinary meeting to keep underselling in check.
Many of the computer makers have vowed that they would not buy the components from Hon Hai unless the company would undersell its products by at least 20%.
And so we had Gregg, who never undersells a lovely-looking dish, telling Anton that his cocoa-marinated loin of venison was "big, bold, bad cooking".
This polymer striker-fired pistol undersells most of the rest of the quality polymer subcompact 9mms on the market.
(I gave in when he said people looking for the latest John Grisham novel might buy it by mistake.) So it is rare that we see a book title like this one, which undersells its subject, describing the dispute over the firing of white educators by a local black school board in Ocean Hill-Brownsville in Brooklyn as one that "changed New York." On fundamental issues of race, education, and labor, the new politics that emerged from Ocean Hill-Brownsville in 1968 devastated American liberalism so profoundly that the effects are still being felt 35 years later.