undershoot

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undershoot

[′ən·dər‚shüt]
(control systems)
The amount by which a system's response to an abrupt change in input falls short of that desired.

undershoot

undershoot
undershoot
Blade connecting to top of the mast.
undershoot
Underslung rotor.
i. A faulty approach of an airplane, which if continued, will result in its landing short of the desired point.
ii. The failure to capture a desired flight condition (air speed, altitude) by falling short when approaching that value from below.
iii. Aircraft weapons impacting short of the desired point of impact.
iv. An area short of a runway or a taxi track. underslung
i. Loads carried by a helicopter that are slung below it by a cable.
ii. A helicopter rotor with its center of gravity below the point at which the rotor is attached to the mast.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Liu equation provides a better prediction of the shear stress undershoot. Though the undershoot from the Liu equation is less abrupt than the measured behavior, its magnitude matches the experimental data.
Though the wall shear stress does not undershoot near the die lip, we believe that this upstream undershoot still helps suppress die lip build-up.
Figure 9 compares the computed shear stress undershoot in flared dies with fixed downstream shear rate [[gamma].sub.2], and with varying upstream shear rates [[gamma].sub.1].
Since instantaneous values of [N.sub.1] at the die lip cannot explain the die drool reduction in flared dies, we next examine the dependence of [N.sub.1] undershoot on the upstream shear rate [[gamma].sub.1].
Therefore, the [N.sub.1] undershoot (though well before the exit) helps reduce the extrudate swell, thus suppressing die lip build-up.
Hence, if the flared section is too long, the polymer melt will forget its upstream undershoot history and there will be no die drool suppression.
Selecting the upstream gap [h.sub.1] to maximize the undershoot of the first normal stress difference [N.sub.1] at the die wall,
We use the Liu equation to calculate undershoot of the first normal stress difference [N.sub.1] at the die wall for various upstream shear rates.
In most applications, overshoot causes more concern than undershoot. "Overshoot will not necessarily destroy your circuits," explained Chin-Hong.