easy

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Related to uneasy: uneasily

easy

Economics
a. readily obtainable
b. (of a market) characterized by low demand or excess supply with prices tending to fall

easy

[′ē·zē]
(computer science)
A name for the hexadecimal digit whose decimal equivalent is 14.
References in classic literature ?
Raffles, walking with the uneasy gait of a town loiterer obliged to do a bit of country journeying on foot, looked as incongruous amid this moist rural quiet and industry as if he had been a baboon escaped from a menagerie.
It is possible, however, that Mr Allworthy saw enough to render him a little uneasy; for we are not always to conclude, that a wise man is not hurt, because he doth not cry out and lament himself, like those of a childish or effeminate temper.
But all was dark and quiet, and creeping back to bed again, he fell, after an hour's uneasy watching, into a second sleep, and woke no more till morning.
The willow-wren with his army also came flying through the air with such a humming, and whirring, and swarming that every one was uneasy and afraid, and on both sides they advanced against each other.
"Your majesty must be rendered very uneasy by the illness of M.
I will not say, 'Do not be uneasy,' because I know that you are so, at this moment; but be as little uneasy as you can.
It will not make you uneasy on Mrs Gowan's account, I hope--for I remember that you said you had the interest of a true friend in her--if I tell you that I wish she could have married some one better suited to her.
P.S.--Particularly remember that you are not to be uneasy about Mrs Gowan.
"If this fool," she said, "should have an uneasy dream and roll into the well men would say that I did it.
The doctor, the monthly nurse, and Dolly and her mother, and most of all Levin, who could not think of the approaching event without terror, began to be impatient and uneasy. Kitty was the only person who felt perfectly calm and happy.
"I can't imagine," says the old gentleman; "and I must say it makes me dreadful uneasy."
"I wonder whether I have any reason to feel uneasy?" she said--half in jest, half in earnest.