uniform corrosion

uniform corrosion

[′yü·nə‚fȯrm kə′rō·zhən]
(metallurgy)
Corrosion which takes place uniformly over the entire exposed surfaces.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In general a distinction is drawn between general or uniform corrosion and localized corrosion like pitting and crevice corrosion.
A possible explanation for this could be the higher amount of pitting in the UC-Mg couple compared to more uniform corrosion in the IA-Mg couple.
Keywords: acoustic emission, uniform corrosion, localized corrosion, stress corrosion cracking, principal component analysis
Low concentration of zirconyl nitrate leads to improve barrier properties and uniform corrosion protection.
As for prediction models, in the following study only models for uniform corrosion, that is a kind of general corrosion that proceeds at the same rate onto the metal surface, will be considered.
The uniform corrosion rate is determined as follows:
IN corrosive environments such those typical for oil and gas applications, a specific level of corrosion resistance against both highly localised and uniform corrosion is necessary.
A practical engineering way to account for a uniform corrosion process is to use a power law to model the loss of wall thickness with the time of exposure.
Metals susceptible to uniform corrosion tend to not have pitting.
The SMAT sample exhibits a uniform corrosion with a larger corrosion rate compared with the coarse-grained sample, which is due to the high activity of surface atoms in the SMAT layer.
Uniform corrosion for titanium implants can be determined from weight loss data (increase or decrease in weight depending upon the environment and by products in accordance to ASTM G1 & G31), dimensional changes (shape, size, appearance and texture) and electrochemical methods (anodic and cathodic polarization, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance measurements).
Uniform corrosion is evenly distributed across the surface with the rate of corrosion being the same over the entire surface (FIGURE 2).

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