unipolar

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unipolar

[¦yü·nə′pō·lər]
(electricity)
Having but one pole, polarity, or direction; when applied to amplifiers or power supplies, it means that the output can vary in only one polarity from zero and, therefore, must always contain a direct-current component.
References in periodicals archive ?
The major implication of the US unipolarity is that there is no possibility of a counter hegemonic alliance formation against the US.
power ensures peace." (11) Primacy sought to capitalize on America's post-Cold War unipolarity through sustained investment in and use of all elements--diplomatic, informational, military, and economic--of national power.
Layne, Christopher, "This time it's real: the end of unipolarity and the Pax Americana" en International Studies Quarterly, num.
Therefore, the modern world is often considered to be a fantastic hybrid--"unimultipolar" system (or even "pluralistic unipolarity").
In the long term, the clear trend towards multipolarity in the economic system may clash with the unipolarity of the monetary system.
in the unipolarity we briefly enjoyed after WWII and the Cold War.
To summarize, in a time when the unipolarity of the international system is highly questioned, China is emerging as a new power that could challenge many of the current global powers.
These three historical sequences are dominated by multi- and then bi-polarity (such as great powers and superpowers); unipolarity (the United States as the last remaining superpower), state-fragility, and the rise of violent nonstate actors; and resurgent multi- or bi-polarity along with the concurrent emergence of high-tech weaponry.
The South China Sea remains a potential flashpoint as Asia undergoes the end of a 25-year era of unipolarity. China is rising and the US rebalance giving Southeast Asian states more options - sometimes bewildering ones - than ever before.
On the other hand, other authors consider that the geopolitics of regions matters in a way in which unipolarity can only be replaced by a multipolar order that emerges through regional unification or the emergence of regional unipolarities (Wohlforth 1999).
Rezende's (2015) model can explain why UNASUR and the SADC were quickly formed and had such positive results during their first years, when Brazil was on its way to establish its unipolarity in the region.
In support of his thesis that unipolarity resulted from a complexity of forces and not simply the collapse of the Soviet Union, Brands constructs solid arguments that address the symbiotic interaction between historical forces and conscious policy decisions.