universality


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universality

[‚yü·nə·vər′sal·əd·ē]
(statistical mechanics)
The hypothesis that the critical exponents of a substance are the same within broad classes of substances of widely varying characteristics, and depend only on the microscopic symmetry properties of the substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
The different versions of the universality thesis form the core element in Confucianism (Hansen, 1991), Judeo-Christian ethics (Outga, 1972), Kant's theory (1993), Mackie's theory (1981), Rawls' theory of justice (Rawls, 1971; Kukathas & Pettit, 1990), and universal prescriptivism (Hare, 1981), for example.
The Sri Lankan government no doubt would wish to avail itself of whatever available law or convention, such as the universality principle or universal jurisdiction, and the International Convention for the Suppression of the Financing of Terrorism, to arrest the possible resurrection of the LTTE and its terror tactics in Sri Lanka.
From the onset, blackbody radiation was unique in possessing the virtue of universality [1, 2].
Puerto Rico's identity as a naturally pleasant place where the inhabitants daily face the political ugliness of its commonwealth status is depicted both accurately and with a universality that will appeal to readers from other lands that don't have full political independence.
Science, as a human activity, could only attain this universality if all human beings living on this planet were to become uniform in terms of their faiths, worldviews, and concepts of reality.
Unfortunately, the authors do not make much mention of the parallel development of social assistance programs, particularly for poor women, and of the way these programs undermined the principles of universality and inclusiveness which the social reformers of the late 19th-century extolled, and which many social policy scholars today still regard as of vital importance in income maintenance.
In nearly 170 pages that span the company's 47 years, the book follows the journey of the man that brought new challenges to performance, new energy to choreography and new appreciation for the universality of dance movement.
"We feel that some of the universality identified here may have been missed previously because to identify this signature, we had to look at amino acid sequences in both forward and reverse orientation, and that is not typically done," he says.
That does not mean that Islam has lost its universality, it only means that as everywhere else in the world, Islam, to a large extent, has adapted to its "local" conditions.
However, when we attend to the "horizonality" of the shared understanding that Gadamer has called the "fusion of horizons," we encounter an understanding that is not only social (shared) but also universal in nature ("an I that is We and a We that is I" [Hegel 110]): Transposing ourselves [into the historical or cultural situation of a text] consists neither in the empathy of one individual for another nor in subordinating another person to our own standards; rather, it always involves rising to a higher universality that overcomes not only our own particularity but also that of the other.
David, da Vinci, Shakespeare, Bach, and others of their stature have remained vital because of the depth and universality of their visions of life.
The drink has experienced a different sort of universality than coffee.