unmark

unmark

(1) In word processing, to deselect a block of text, which usually removes its highlight.

(2) To deselect an item that has been tagged for a particular purpose.
References in classic literature ?
The linen was also new, and unmarked. The receipted shop-bill was found with it.
His manners, however, must have been unmarked, wavering, dubious, or she could not have been so misled.
And so I swam slowly on, waiting for my head to touch the top of the corridor, which would mean that I had reached the limit of my flight and the point where I must sink for ever to an unmarked grave.
For many months the strange life of the three went on unmarked by any unusual occurrences.
The evening passed quietly, unmarked by any thing extraordinary.
Blunt came towards me in all the elegance of his slimness and affirming in every line of his face and body, in the correct set of his shoulders and the careless freedom of his movements, the superiority, the inexpressible superiority, the unconscious, the unmarked, the not-to-be-described, and even not- to-be-caught, superiority of the naturally born and the perfectly finished man of the world, over the simple young man.
The day was unmarked therefore by anything to interest her imagination beyond the sight of a very elegant monument to the memory of Mrs.
His watch was a cheap one, his linen unmarked, and his clothes bore only the name of a great New York retail establishment.
To his great baptism flocked With awe the regions round, and with them came From Nazareth the son of Joseph deemed To the flood Jordan--came as then obscure, Unmarked, unknown.
"She really might be six years old," was all she said, however, this judgment referring to the smooth unmarked outline of the girl's face, and not condemning her otherwise, for if Rachel were ever to think, feel, laugh, or express herself, instead of dropping milk from a height as though to see what kind of drops it made, she might be interesting though never exactly pretty.
Not long since I read his epitaph in the old Lincoln burying-ground, a little on one side, near the unmarked graves of some British grenadiers who fell in the retreat from Concord -- where he is styled "Sippio Brister" -- Scipio Africanus he had some title to be called -- "a man of color," as if he were discolored.
I thought that the Sorbonne professor would express his anger openly, but, on the contrary, by a visibly violent effort, he calmed himself, took off his gloves, and showed his hands; they were unmarked by any cicatrix.