unpaired electron

unpaired electron

[¦ən‚perd i′lek‚trän]
(atomic physics)
An orbital electron for which there is no other electron in the same atom with the same energy but opposite spin.
References in periodicals archive ?
The oxygen molecule is then left with an unpaired electron in its outer orbit, making it highly unstable.
They cover the basic science, magnetic interaction between particles, isotropic hyperfine effects in spectra, Zeeman energy (g) anisotropy, hyperfine (A) anisotropy, systems with more than one unpaired electron, paramagnetic species in the gas range, transition-group ions, the interpretation of parameters, relaxation times, linewidths and spin kinetic phenomena, noncontinuous excitation of spins, and double-resonance techniques.
thought the paramagnetic center, unpaired electron, existed in a delocalized molecular orbital rather than localized on one atom, which was thought as a proper explanation.
Each copper ion, which sits at the corner of the molecular cube, contains one unpaired electron. These spins are disordered at normal temperatures, a state known as paramagnetism; however, the spins begin to align in opposite directions as the temperature drops, creating a state called anti ferromagnetism.
The problem with air is that it partly consists of oxygen atoms with one unpaired electron. That single electron often couples to the nuclei, which greatly broadens the lines on the spectrum, increasing their tendency to overlap and making them that much more difficult to interpret.
This process is referred to as a free radical induced chain reaction and will continue until the free radical pairs up with a compound that has an unpaired electron or is deactivated by a chain reaction breaking antioxidant.
A molecule with an unpaired electron must either acquire an additional electron from some other molecule or get rid of the ofd one.
One of the axioms of most textbooks of inorganic chemistry is that a monomeric M.sup II compound of a Group III element will have an unpaired electron and is unlikely to exist.
Radicals are ubiquitous short-lived reaction intermediates that contain a single unpaired electron and are usually created in pairs in a well-defined electronic spin state, either singlet ("anti-parallel spins") or triplet ("parallel spins").
A free radical is any substance that contains an unpaired electron. They are highly unstable and react with other molecules.
They conclude the volume with discussion of special topics, including the effects of chemical exchange on relaxation phenomena and measurements, relaxation processes in systems containing quadrupolar nuclei, paramagnetic systems containing unpaired electron spin, and NMR relaxation in other aggregation states.
These are atoms that have an extra unpaired electron, which makes them unstable - in healthy tissue, they can harm regular molecules by stealing electrons and damaging DNA.