untuned

untuned

[¦ən′tünd]
(electricity)
Not resonant at any of the frequencies being handled.
References in classic literature ?
The tinkle of more or less untuned cottage pianos floated out of open stern-ports till the gas-lamps began to twinkle in the streets, and the ship's night-watchman, coming sleepily on duty after his unsatisfactory day slumbers, hauled down the flags and fastened a lighted lantern at the break of the gangway.
In the first, they will help professional paranormal investigators attempt to record electronic voice phenomena using an untuned radio that spirits are able to switch between frequencies to form messages from a jigsaw of words spoken on different stations.
The uncalibrated and untuned photos showcase high-resolution views of Tokyo, Bangkok, Baltimore, Las Vegas, and Aleppo, Syria.
The volume was set to 11 and, for untuned ears, much of it just sounds like wailing and who can guitar-shred fastest but the mainly teen audience loved every minute.
Lord Heseltine speaking in Birmingham as his No Stone Untuned report was launched
The calibration procedure involves (1) developing the initial, untuned model from construction documents; (2) measuring interzonal airflow directions in the building and comparing them to the simulated ones, thereby establishing the initial value of the evaluation metric; (3) taking measurements of airflows in the building guided by the locations of incorrect interzonal airflow directions (initially, step 3 may also include measurements of other parameters, such as envelope leakage, depending on time, cost, and interest or need to know their actual values); (4) recalculating the metric and assessing progress; and (5) repeating steps 3 and 4 until satisfactory agreement is achieved, improvement plateaus, or all possible measurements have been taken.
Who untuned Daddy's fork when he could have preached his bone in all positions and places?
would detect the untuned string and could identify with Saul's
In another experiment, volunteers who were craving a food watched a flickering pattern of black and white dots on a monitor (similar to an untuned television set).
For example, Gordon's insightful subversion of the custom of playing "in tune" is a perfect vehicle for the theme of decay, for tuning must be maintained periodically and frequently corrected, since instruments that remain untuned for long periods actually lose their ability to maintain accuracy of pitch for a reasonable length of time, or in some cases to be tuned at all.
Left untuned by our talk, it would be a terrifying cacophony; we would be deafened by the roar of randomness.