updraft

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updraft

A localized upward current of air.
References in periodicals archive ?
When there is a large difference between winds aloft and winds at ground level, a rising updraft can become vertically separated from the downdraft that forms when the weight of precipitation exceeds the lift of the rising air.
The rising cumuliform cloud so far represents an updraft. This is one of the two primary parts of a storm.
To form, hailstorms require moisture, an updraft, variable winds and freezing temperatures at lower levels of the storm cloud, he said.
This indicated that the birds were taking advantage of strong updrafts. The researchers also speculate that flying low allows the birds to use gentler updrafts that dissipate with height.
UPDRAFT: Warm, moist air flows upward, giving the storm its energy.
This is explained by Korolev and Isaac [10], who posit that SLD formed in updrafts have an average life of a few tenths of a second.
You'll have to be super quiet to sneak up on a gray fox or a mule deer, but they're here, as are red-tailed hawks that soar on updrafts off the canyon walls.
Thunderstorms, more severe with increasing greenhouse emissions, can loft water vapor up to four miles into the stratosphere: "In essence, the team found that thunderstorms and their powerful, convective updrafts drive unexpectedly large concentrations of water vapor high into the stratosphere," Spotts reports.
Inside a thunderstorm cloud, warm air rises in updrafts, pushing tiny aerosols from pollution or other particles upwards.
But as we find ourselves caught in the fierce updrafts of an information hurricane, we often lose sight of what reading--as an intellectual activity--contributes to our sense of self, our cultural awareness, our capacity for self-expression and, ultimately, our notions of engaged citizenship and the collective good."
Meteorologists said the jet entered an unusual storm with 100mph updrafts that acted as a vacuum, sucking water up from the ocean.
Meteorologists said the Air France jet entered an unusual storm with 100 mph updrafts that acted as a vacuum, sucking water up from the ocean.