updrift

updrift

[′əp‚drift]
(oceanography)
The direction which is opposite that of the prevailing movement of littoral material.
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Assuming that full employment prevailed, the appropriate initial response of the monetary authorities to a disturbance tending to cause depreciation would be to tighten credit and cushion the original tendency toward depreciation in order to avoid a strong updrift of prices and a pressure for a shift of labor and capital that might prove excessive.
This occurs because the rocky outcrops shelter the Kanyakumari beach and manmade features such as harbour across the surfzone would act as a barrier and sand would be deposited on the updrift side of such barrier.
Kanyakumari beach shows accretion invariably in all the seasons which may be attributed to the fact that the study site in that beach falls on the updrift side of the groins.
Goldsmith (1972) suggested that the spit was periodically breached at an updrift location and a new inlet migrated southerly at some multi-decadal to centurial time scale.
A decline in inflationary expectations when economic conditions are weak is pernicious because any downdrift in inflation expectations leads to an updrift in real interest rates and a tightening of financial conditions,' she said.
Table 1 also shows an updrift in the average age of vehicles held by households, from 7.
Net beach profile volume loss occurs at the study site only in the most distant profiles, profile 1 updrift and profile 29 down drift, in excess of 1000 feet on either side of the experimental structure.
A number of members commented that the persisting updrift in some key measures of core inflation had become increasingly worrisome.
Some sediment from updrift areas enters the throat of the inlet along a weir at the seaward end of the north jetty (Stauble and Cialone, 1995).
The problem: Trapping sand on the updrift side of a jetty or groin robs sand from the other side.