uplift

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uplift

the process or result of land being raised to a higher level, as during a period of mountain building

uplift

1. The upward pressure on a structure due to the pressure of the water below.
2. The pressure acting on a material that tends to lift it off its supports or fasteners as a result of an external force (for example, wind) acting on it.
References in periodicals archive ?
(8) Tonya Bolden, The Book of African American Women: 150 Crusaders, Creators and Uplifters, Adams Media, Avon, Mass., 1996.
Boycott opponents questioned the loyalty, wisdom, and judgement of the boycotters, whom they denounced as "uplifters and left-wingers" seeking an "emotional outlet" heedless of the consequences of their actions.
On both occasions, it was damned by moral uplifters, praised by lovers of literary grotesquerie and said by medical doctors to constitute an accurate account of incipient insanity.
He was the scourge of boobus Americanus, nemesis of "bureaucrats, policemen, wowsers, snouters, smellers, uplifters, lawyers, bishops, and all other sworn enemies of the free man." Nearly a half-century after his death, he still has a devoted, if diminished, following.
I collected autographs of my musical uplifters. There were also popular ones, such as Joe Liggins and His Honey Drippers, Billy Rudolph's Wildrooters, Lil Green's In the Dark Band and Louis Jordan and His Tympany Five.
Given his impatience with sentimentalists, humanitarians, and "uplifters" of all kinds, it is surprising at first glance to find Irving Babbitt among those "getting right with Lincoln"--even to a modest degree--especially at the height of the Progressive Era's dreamy infatuation with the Lincoln mystique.
If the European immigrant after two or three generations of exposure to our schools, politics, advertising, moral crusades, and restaurants becomes indistinguishable from the mass of Americans of the older stock (despite the influence of the foreign-language press), how much truer must it be of those sons of Ham who have been subjected to what the uplifters call Americanism for the last three hundred years.