upper-air chart

upper-air chart

[¦əp·ər ¦er ′chärt]
(meteorology)

upper-air chart

A chart used for forecasting and showing the wind pattern and pressures at 40,000, 35,000, 30,000, 18,000, 10,000, and 5000 ft above mean sea level (200, 250, 300, 500, 700, and 850 hectopascals). Contours are drawn at intervals of 200 ft (60 m) at lower levels and 400 ft (120 m) at levels above 30,000 AMSL (300 hectopascals). Also called an upper-level chart
References in periodicals archive ?
Look at upper-air charts; weak winds are probably just the humble MCC.
Fred routinely offered guidance to younger forecasters in the real-time hand analysis of surface and upper-air charts, which hung on the walls of NSSFC daily as important briefing tools and aids to understanding atmospheric developments leading up to the current time.