upper-level ridge

upper-level ridge

[¦əp·ər ¦lev·əl ′rij]
(meteorology)
A pressure ridge existing in the upper air, especially one that is stronger aloft than near the earth's surface. Also known as high-level ridge; ridge aloft; upper ridge.
References in periodicals archive ?
A strengthening upper-level ridge of high pressure is the culprit - or the benefactor, depending on your view of extremely hot weather - for the continued high temperatures.
The heat is the result of an upper-level ridge of high pressure that began building Saturday and centered over Southern California, according to the NWS.
An upper-level ridge of high pressure - a really strong one - has built up over us, moving basically from the southeast Nevada desert," said meteorologist Wanda Likens at the Weather Service office in Portland.
The explanation from the National Weather Service in Portland is that an upper-level ridge of high pressure is building just off the Pacific Northwest coast, and is combining with a surface-level trough of low pressure near the coast to create a warm air mass.