uprush


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uprush

[′əp‚rəsh]
(meteorology)
The strong upward-flow air current in cumulus clouds during their stage of rapid development, often preceding a thunderstorm. Also known as vertical jet.
(oceanography)
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

uprush

The strong upward-flow air current in cumulus clouds during their stage of rapid development, often preceding a thunderstorm. Also known as a vertical jet.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
In order to reflect the uprush feature of the pressure during typhoon, the mutation factor is introduced in this paper.
But the uprush of air is still lifting him higher and higher.
That something can even produce an uprush of joy as one dies.
That was the same time period when you had this enormous uprush of securitization and you had this enormous distribution of highly-rated, high-yield securitized debt to investors who were misled as to the risks inherent in that debt.
Ure notes that these plays, particularly The Hour Glass, are "entirely swamped by the uprush of the 'system'" (95), but comments (a propos of Auden's elegy for Yeats) that "Auden was wrong, for, while it is true that A Vision has no intrinsic value, in its intimate relationship with the poetry it meant everything--or nearly everything--to Yeats the artist" (95).
Yet in the midst of crisis, more films are getting made in Europe every year because of automatic subsidies and lower costs, and there's also an uprush of mediocre films made in a semiprofessional way."
There he is currently updating thoughts on "subliminal uprush" and "functional shift" by putting his students through various tests--MEG (Magnetoencephalography) and fMRI (functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging)--while reading Shakespeare "with electrodes placed on different parts of the scalp." William Shakespeare, Gent., meet Victor Frankenstein, M.D.
The authors describe Myers's ideas that genius is a supernormal uprush of inspiration from the subliminal mind and that psi and genius-level inspiration emerge from the deepest levels of the subliminal realm.
not only the battalion but the German one or regiment or whatever it was, the two of them running toward each other now, empty-handed, approaching until he could see, distinguish the individual faces but still all one face, one expression, and then he knew suddenly that his too looked like that, all of them did: tentative, amazed, defenseless, and then he heard the voices too and knew that his was one also--a thin murmuring sound rising into the incredible silence like a chirping of lost birds, forlorn and defenseless too; and then he knew what the other thing was even before the frantic uprush of the rockets from behind the two wires, German and British too.
When Mantel became even more depressed under his care, he suggested that she might spend some time in the university's clinic and be treated with stronger and stronger antidepressants and then antipsychotics; these drugs, though, exacerbated her symptoms, creating an "uprush of killing fear" and "hammering heart" and unbearable anxiety.
Another example occurs with the last uprush of water upon a sandy beach, pushing bits of shell, seaweed and other light materials to the line of its farthest reach.
On the one hand, each present moment of time is itself twofold, "its very uprush [jaillissement] being in two jets exactly symmetrical, one of which fails back [retombe] towards the past whilst the other springs forward [s'elance] towards the future." (66) In this double movement, memory is recreated by the falling back of the present, while the future is created by the forward impetus of the present.