upstairs


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upstairs

The portion of a house or small building situated on the floors above the main or entrance floor. upstand, upturn The part of a roof covering that turns up against a vertical surface.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
"Wait a moment," I said, and jumped up, upsetting my wine to run upstairs as fast as I could.
"If you have missed anything of yours upstairs, my dear young Monsieur, you mustn't say it's me.
Henry advised taking her upstairs first, and then asking the manager's opinion.
She soon returned, with the direction that the wounded person was to be carried, carefully, upstairs to Mr.
Then, bending over Oliver, he helped to carry him upstairs, with the care and solicitude of a woman.
They went upstairs, and for five minutes all was silence.
There would have been nothing out of the common in my having got tired of the library, and having gone upstairs for a change.
Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow as if he were almost fainting.
"If we had known you had a lady upstairs," replied Athos, with his customary coolness, "we would have asked permission to pay our respects to her."
Following him with her eyes, and going down a little way herself to get the better of an intervening angle, she beheld him thrust his head in at the parlour-door, draw it back again with great swiftness, and immediately begin a retreat upstairs with all possible expedition.
All further inquiries were superseded by the appearance of old Wardle, who, running upstairs and just recognising Lowten, passed at once into Mr.
My mother was sitting by the fire, but poorly in health, and very low in spirits, looking at it through her tears, and desponding heavily about herself and the fatherless little stranger, who was already welcomed by some grosses of prophetic pins, in a drawer upstairs, to a world not at all excited on the subject of his arrival; my mother, I say, was sitting by the fire, that bright, windy March afternoon, very timid and sad, and very doubtful of ever coming alive out of the trial that was before her, when, lifting her eyes as she dried them, to the window opposite, she saw a strange lady coming up the garden.