upwelling

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upwelling

[¦əp¦wel·iŋ]
(oceanography)
The process by which water rises from a deeper to a shallower depth, usually as a result of divergence of offshore currents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Prior to UpWell, Walker served as COO at both Imagine Health and Optum, UnitedHealth Group's USD40 bn health services arm.
Periods of stronger wind push surface water aside, allowing deeper and warmer water to rise up or upwell and replace it, Dr Roberts said.
Each was stabbed 10 times last month at the isolated cottage in Upwell, Norfolk, where spinster Janice bred whippets.
Police said last night that their bodies were discovered at their home on the outskirts of Upwell, near Wisbech, Cambs, on Sunday after a concerned neighbour called police.
Chris, of Upwell, Cambs, had left his car on a 20-minute space but the train's next stop was York.
Because warm water is less dense than cool water, the increasing temperature spread has made it more difficult for the underlying nutrient-rich water to upwell, says Verburg.
"The edge of the continental shelf is a key location where nutrient-rich water upwells to the surface, stimulating the growth of the tiny plants and animals that form the basis of the food web," said Glen Gawarkiewicz, a physical oceanographer at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.
Ohwaki, "Numerical experiments of upwelling in Tokyo Bay in relation to "Aoshio" (the upwelled anoxic blue-green turbid water)," Bulletin on Coastal Oceanography, vol.
This upwelled water is relatively rich in iron, the macronutrient needed for growth by most organisms, and the production is high in many areas of the Galapagos and surrounding waters [7].
Due to natural upwells and ocean acidification, more corrosive water below 1,000 m depths (the saturation horizon) is reaching the upper 200 m--where the marine snails feed on phytoplankton and detritus.
The high productivity of the California Current (CC) is primarily the result of local wind-driven seasonal upwelling and the interaction of alongshore currents with prominent coastal features such as capes, headlands, and bays that advect upwelled water masses into complex patterns of offshore filaments and coastal retentive eddies (Davis, 1985; Gan and Allen, 2002).
The Southern Ocean is the only place on the globe where water upwells from this depth.