uranium hexafluoride


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uranium hexafluoride

[yə′rā·nē·əm ¦hek·sə′flu̇r‚īd]
(inorganic chemistry)
UF6 Highly toxic, radioactive, corrosive, colorless crystals; soluble in carbon tetrachloride, fluorocarbons, and liquid halogens; it reacts vigorously with alcohol, water, ether, and most metals, and it sublimes; used to separate uranium isotopes in the gaseous-diffusion process.
References in periodicals archive ?
Uranium hexafluoride is a chemical compound consisting of one atom of uranium combined with six atoms of fluorine.
Iran has enough uranium hexafluoride containing up to 5% uranium-235, which, if further enriched, would yield enough weapons-grade HEU for several nuclear weapons.
Conversion is the process by which yellowcake is converted into uranium hexafluoride for enrichment.
"On November 16, no cascades were being fed with UF6" or uranium hexafluoride, the nine-page report reads, without offering an explanation for the outages.
The plant would process depleted uranium hexafluoride tails from the enrichment of uranium for production of commercial nuclear reactor fuel.
The conversion facility manufactures uranium hexafluoride as a raw material used for uranium enrichment and forms the core of the country's nuclear development along with a uranium enrichment facility in Natanz.
Scientists have injected 55 pounds of 3.5 per cent enriched uranium hexafluoride gas into a cascade of centrifuges at a laboratory in Natanz.
In the latest report from, the International Atomic Energy Agency it states that "Iran now has, at a minimum, 1,430 kilograms (3,153 pounds) of low-enriched uranium hexafluoride. Iran insists its program is peaceful."[Ibid]
Cameco Corporation (TSX: CCO) (NYSE: CCJ), a Canada-based uranium mining company, has resumed production of uranium hexafluoride (UF6) at the Port Hope conversion facility, in Ontario, Canada.
According to IAEA report, Tehran has stockpiled at least 1,339 kg of low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6).
Uranium tailings [leftover waste in the form of sand] contain extremely harmful radioactive and toxic uranium hexafluoride, but Russia is willing to take these materials from other countries for processing, long-term storage and, eventually, burial in special containers.
In a sign of the Iranian programme's increased effectiveness, this week's IAEA report said that in the six months between December and May Iran put 2300kg of the feedstock uranium hexafluoride into the centrifuges at its facility at Natanz.